Overview: How to use google sheets for ABA data collection

author Ian Vignes   2 month ago
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This video shows you how to use google drive and google sheets for ABA data collection. It can be used regardless of what curriculum or protocol book you are using. In this case, we were using VBMAPP, but I have used it for ABLLS as well as CPIRK. Soon this template will be available for purchase from TeachersPayTeachers.

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