Cisco Identity Services Engine (ISE) Web Gui Overview

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Cisco ISE Passive Identity Connector Overview

The Cisco® ISE Passive Identity Connector consolidates multiple sources of authentication data into a single source of truth. It simplifies the installation of Cisco security products, and it offloads work from key infrastructure. Learn more at cisco.com/go/isepic.

POP3 vs IMAP - What's the difference?

What is POP and IMAP? How does email work? This is an animated video explaining the difference between POP and IMAP. These are email protocols that are used to retrieve email from an email client, such as Microsoft Outlook. Should I choose POP or IMAP? Which one is better?

How IT Works: Cisco Identity Services Engine

http://cdw.io/gIVnXO Find out how to perfect network admission control across user devices and other gear — think cameras, phones and displays — on your wired and wireless networks. ​Get pointers on how to best improve your security posture at http://cdw.io/gIVnXO Explore how Cisco and CDW can transform your environment at http://cdw.io/bk1xhT Jump on the bus and get more insights from smart techies on the IT Roadshow; go to http://cdw.io/qVyQHU FEATURED SPEAKER: Allen Schmidt ► Security Solutions Architect, CDW Nathan Coutinho ► Director, Digital Workspace Solutions, CDW ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- SALES ASSISTANCE 800.800.4239 (Mon-Fri 7am-7:30pm CT) SUBSCRIBE TO OUR E-MAIL NEWSLETTER http://cdw.io/newsletter LET'S CONNECT! Twitter ►http://cdw.io/TwitterTechVision Facebook ► http://cdw.io/FacebookTechVision LinkedIn ► http://cdw.io/LinkedInTechVision Spiceworks ► http://cdw.io/SpiceworksTechVision Blog ► http://cdw.io/BlogTechVision

What is an API?

What exactly is an API? Finally learn for yourself in this helpful video from MuleSoft, the API experts. https://www.mulesoft.com/platform/api The textbook definition goes something like this: “An application programming interface (API) is a set of routines, protocols, and tools for building software applications. An API expresses a software component in terms of its operations, inputs, outputs, and underlying types. An API defines functionalities that are independent of their respective implementations, which allows definitions and implementations to vary without compromising each other. A good API makes it easier to develop a program by providing all the building blocks. APIs often come in the form of a library that includes specifications for routines, data structures, object classes, and variables. In other cases, notably SOAP and REST services, an API is simply a specification of remote calls exposed to the API consumers. An API specification can take many forms, including an International Standard, such as POSIX, vendor documentation, such as the Microsoft Windows API, or the libraries of a programming language, e.g., the Standard Template Library in C++ or the Java APIs. An API differs from an application binary interface (ABI) in that an API is source code-based while an ABI is a binary interface. For instance POSIX is an API, while the Linux Standard Base provides an ABI”. To speak plainly, an API is the messenger that runs and delivers your request to the provider you’re requesting it from, and then delivers the response back to you. To give you a familiar example, think of an API as a waiter in a restaurant. Imagine you’re sitting at the table with a menu of choices to order from, and the kitchen is the provider who will fulfill your order. What’s missing is the critical link to communicate your order to the kitchen and deliver your food back to your table. That’s where the waiter (or API) comes in. ”AHEM” The waiter takes your order, delivers it to the kitchen, and then delivers the food (or response) back to you. (Hopefully without letting your order crash if designed correctly) Now that we’ve whetted your appetite, let’s apply this to a real API example. In keeping with our theme, let’s book a flight to a culinary capital – Paris. You’re probably familiar with the process of searching for airline flights online. Just like at a restaurant, you have a menu of options to choose from ( a dropdown menu in this case). You choose a departure city and date, a return city and date, cabin class, and other variables (like meal or seating, baggage or pet requests) In order to book your flight, you interact with the airline’s website to access the airline’s database to see if any seats are available on those dates, and what the cost might be based on certain variables. But, what if you are not using the airline’s website, which has direct access to the information? What if you are using online travel service that aggregates information from many different airlines? Just like a human interacts with the airline’s website to get that information, an application interacts with the airline’s API. The API is the interface that, like your helpful waiter, runs and and delivers the data from that online travel service to the airline’s systems over the Internet. It also then takes the airline’s response to your request and delivers right back to the online travel service . And through each step of the process it facilitates that interaction between the travel service and the airline’s systems - from seat selection to payment and booking. So now you can see that it’s APIs that make it possible for us all to use travel sites. They interface with with airlines’ APIs to gather information in order to present options back to us The same goes for all interactions between applications, data and devices - they all have API’s that allow computers to operate them, and that's what ultimately creates connectivity. API’s provide a standard way of accessing any application, data or device whether it is shopping from your phone, or accessing cloud applications at work. So, whenever you think of an API, just think of it as your waiter running back and forth between applications, databases and devices to deliver data and create the connectivity that puts the world at our fingertips. And whenever you think of creating an API, think MuleSoft.

Detect and Protect with Cisco Stealthwatch and ISE on TechWiseTV

See more from TechWiseTV: http://cs.co/900781xZx Are you getting the full visibility and advanced threat protection you need across wired, wireless, and your WAN? Watch and see how Cisco Identity Services Engine (ISE) and Stealthwatch work together to deliver end-to-end monitoring and rapid threat containment using your existing network. Join the pros at TechWiseTV and learn how these primary pieces of the Cisco Digital Network Architecture work together to deliver security intelligence across your existing network.

A quick browse through web GUI video of Cisco. Identity Services Engine (ISE)

Version: 2.0.1.130

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